lead-er-ship: (n.) a person who guides or directs a group

th20I have always said there is more to being the boss than being bossy. A lot more. I think there is a tendency for us to confuse – and it is easy to do – the ideology of leadership with the act of supervision. Clearly, many situations and tasks need supervision; however, leadership is a bigger, broader picture than telling someone when and how to do something. Consequently, there are great supervisors who would not necessarily make great leaders and vice versa. Leadership comes in different sizes, shapes, colors, styles and gender – and at times from the most unlikely of places. Leadership styles aside – and there is an abundance of self-surveys available on-line and in any bookstore to help us figure out which particular brand each of us subscribes to – the following are several ideas for consideration about leadership:

  • Leaders have passion and vision. thCA042G37A leader not only has passion and dedication to the mission of the organization but also a vision for the organization beyond what is happening today or this week. He or she has a vision of how the organization’s mission will be played out in the next year as well as five years from now and uses many resources to guide the organization toward that vision.
  • Leaders focus on relationships. Leaders appear to know everyone because they understand the inherent value of relationships – both within the organization and in the community at-large. Good leaders do not readily “burn bridges” and they are skilled at networking and maintaining relationships even in the face of thCA8NY9DMadversary.
  • Leaders listen. Leaders also understand the art of listening to the other people around them (community stakeholders, staff, board members, partner organizations). Rather than frequently arguing their own agenda, leaders are more intent on listening to others in order to determine from whom their strongest support is coming in order to guide the organization toward the vision.
  • Leaders maintain poise and grace under pressure. A leader maintains positive energy even during trying circumstances. Contrary to the boss who seems to think that yelling, tantrums and blame are the only ways in which to get something done, a leader maintains personal dignity as well as that of the organization and rarely displays a disorderly response. thCAF169LIWhile ‘Fear Factor’ may make good television drama, it certainly has no place or benefit in¬†non-profit management. Perpetual negative responses (or interactions) tend to diminish others’ confidence in one’s ability to lead.
  • Leadership develops leadership. Conversely, a leader bears the self-confidence in his or her own leadership such that other staff in the organization are encouraged to develop professionally. Leaders are comfortable in their roles. He or she not only supports and welcomes professional development but is also wise to consider his or her own succession at some point.
  • Leaders accept change. All of us have most likely experienced difficulty with th13change at some point in our lives. On the other hand, change is necessary and good. Leaders not only accept change, they often flourish with it, making change work for them and their organizations. Moreover, leaders effect change in order to guide the organization toward the vision for it.
  • Leaders lead. Plain and simple: Supervisors supervise and leaders lead. Finally, a leader who transgresses into others’ roles within the organization is not likely to thCAZVYZ05be as effective and efficient in facilitating the bigger picture development of the organization as one who clearly communicates¬† vision and goals for the organization. Leaders understand the hierarchy of the organization and how best to navigate it.

To Facebook Or Not To Facebook, That Is The Question: The Role of Social Media in Fundraising

thCAZ7PAN7Yes, I know that I am using Facebook as a verb in the title. It’s at that level. The social medias have made an often incomprehensible imprint on our culture as a people such that it is difficult to remember what we did before their genesis. According to Huffington Post Tech blogger, Brian Honigman, Facebook’s active monthly users now total nearly 850 million people as well as 250 million photos are uploaded everyday (source: Jeff Bullas). That’s a lot of people with a lot of pictures! One more fun fact: As of 2012, 210,000 years of music have been played on Facebook (source: Gizmodo). Now that is very compelling about its size and scope!

Along with the proliferation of social media sites on the world wide web (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pintrest, Google+, YouTube, etc.), thCAEL4EITso too have there been a plethora of writings, lectures and webinars (ad nauseam) on their fundraising uses by and potential impact on the non-profit community. In addition to the social media giants like Facebook and Twitter, the advent of sites like Google+ and YouTube have made it easier than ever to promote non-profit organizations with photos and video of events and activities. Social media is a wonderful invention and can be an excellent accompaniment to a non-profit organization’s marketing or development plan but it plays a very prescribed role in the activity of fundraising.

A discussion about the role of social media in non-profits needs to be prefaced by a key concept. A non-profit organization’s website is the foundation of its on-line presence. th12In other words, the organization’s website is like its on-line “home-base” of operation, including a place at which visitors and supporters are able to make secure on-line donations. The website serves as a reflection of the organization’s mission in the community and communicates it’s values and philosophies to all who visit it. Sounds beautiful, right? But perhaps the single biggest problem for organizations and their websites is maintaining them. The organization’s website needs to be as current and timely as possible at all times. There is nothing worse than going to a non-profit’s website, clicking on the ‘News’ tab and finding that the latest news is from 2010. Thud! Did nothing happen since then? When potential donors – both seasoned and newcomers – feel that they are not being actively engaged in the current events of the organization by visiting the website, they may move on to other organizations that do. Typically, the management of a non-profit’s website may be a task of the development director or department; however, smaller organizations that do not have the luxury of a development staff are encouraged to select a point person within the organization to perform maintenance and update tasks on the web site on a routine basis.

The value in non-profits utilizing the power of social media to raise funds is not in all the thCA7Z6QPLmillions they will rake in simply from being on Facebook or Twitter. Rather, the value of social media in non-profit is to bring donors to the organization’s website. That is where the real “business” of the organization happens and why it is so important that it is functional and current. The real “job” of social media like Facebook or Twitter in a non-profit organization is to generate interest in the organization and the mission, prompting the potential donor to think, “I’d really like to get involved there” or “I’d like to contribute” and subsequently leading them back to the website where they can make a contribution or volunteer. Social media can be used to inform or teach lay visitors about the mission of the organization, often in creative ways. I saw one organization place a quiz about homelessness on their Facebook page in order that visitors can test their own knowledge of the social problem. Social media can be used to highlight the organization’s partnerships with businesses and other organizations in addition to thanking them publicly. Moreover, the social medias are fun and they can and should be used to create excitement or anticipation about the organization’s activities or events – and again, take donors back to the website when they have “bought” the idea on Facebook or Twitter. If an organization holds an annual fundraising golf tournament; for example, Facebook and Twitter thCA3QZEQCare very good social media to not only raise awareness of the event but also to increase the excitement and anticipation for it with strategically timed posts and tweets – and with the added result of possibly bringing more people on board!

Similar to the organization’s website, a non-profit’s social media sites need to be just as well maintained. Once a social media page or account has been established, it does a non-profit little good if it just lies out there in cyberspace. It looks like nothing happens at the organization and in some ways that can be fatal. I have followed several local non-profits on Twitter; for example, but quite honestly, I’ve lost interest in them because they never put any tweets out. They are not telling us anything about their organizations and thereby letting their presence be known by not communicating often enough. Finally, a non-profit organization’s social media is likely going to be as effective as the organization itself. thCAJFZ195The bottom line is that there needs to be substance behind the posts or tweets. In other words, when an organization is merely taking up (cyber) space just for the sake of being there and there is no real “meat” in the posts or tweets, it tends to come through. If a non-profit organization is struggling – for whatever reasons – it may be best to focus all of the organization’s resources and energy on resolving those issues before moving forward with a social media marketing plan.


The Huffington Post; Tech Blog by Brian Honigman; “100 Fascinating Social Media Statistics and Figures From 2012”, November 29, 2012. Retrieved from: